Be Prepared for the Unexpected!!

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In creating an effective crisis management plan, your organization should explore various potential crises your organization can face, such as fire, weather-related perils, workplace violence, and cyber-attacks. After assessing the risks, create a crisis management plan to address those risks identified. This process should be assessed regularly to strengthen any weaknesses in the current plan or identify new risks.

Crisis Management Plans should include the following:

  • Procedures for the immediate response to a crisis, business operations plan, and a contingency plan for every potential crisis identified.
  • Updated inventory of your organization’s personal property and equipment to ease the insurance claims process
  • Identify Employees’ Roles
  • Identify Individuals who are designated to take charge during an emergency

Your crisis management plan should be able to answer, “What do we do [potential situation]?” Your crisis management plan should be reviewed by your attorney and regularly updated. The most effective strategy is to be prepared.

Many insurance carriers can provide additional information to assist with your crisis management plan. Let us know if you have any questions, we are here to help.

THIS IS INTENDED TO BE USED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND NOT TO BE CONSTRUED AS LEGAL ADVICE

Are You Ready for the New Year?

Be Prepared or it Can Cost You! 

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As the New Year begins, it is important for every organization to review their risk management procedures by addressing any weaknesses to prevent potential accidents that lead to costly claims. One risk management tool to assist in mitigating the costs of claims arising out of your organization’s operations is to have adequate insurance coverage in place. Without proper insurance coverage, one lawsuit or a catastrophic loss can close down your operations.

While there are numerous insurance coverages available in the marketplace, the following are basic coverages that every organization should consider:

  • Commercial Property Insurance covers your building, personal property, and equipment in the event of a fire, theft, storm, and other perils outlined in the policy. Consider adding Business Interruption and Equipment breakdown coverages to the property policy. Make sure that you insure your buildings and personal property/equipment to reflect the replacement cost value [cost to restore or replace damaged property without deduction for depreciation]. The failure of adequately insuring your property (at least 80%) can result in a co- insurance penalty. Co-Insurance penalty reduces the amount of recovery that you may expect to recover if you under report the value of your Consider purchasing flood and earthquake insurance, since most property policies exclude damage or losses resulting from earthquake and flood.
  • General Liability Insurance provides coverage for liability claims from a third party (such as a client, vendor, visitor, etc.) for Bodily Injury and Property damage due to negligence. Most General Liability policies include liability coverage for Products/Completed Operations and Personal Injury (i.e. slander or libel).
  • Volunteer-Accident Insurance covers individuals who donates their work to your organization without pay. Coverage is triggered when those individuals are injured while performing duties related to the conduct of your business.
  • Workers’ Compensation covers the medical treatments, disability, and death benefits of employees who are injured or killed during the course of employment. In California, employers must carry worker’s compensation if they hire employees. It is imperative that every organization ensures their work environment is safe as claims history is one of the factors that determines
    Directors & Officers Liability and Employment Practice Liability Coverage: Coverage for Directors and Officers liability can be stand alone or coupled with other coverages such as Employment Practice Liability. It is important to read the policies terms, conditions, and exclusions of your policy and review the coverage with your attorney. It is also important to check if your policy’s defense limits is inside or outside the liability
    1. Directors & Officers Liability- the Board of Directors is ultimately responsible for the nonprofit organization. It is therefore important that they are informed of their legal liability, risk management program, and the organization’s insurance coverages. Directors and officers liability protects the individuals who serve on an organization’s board of directors against claims brought by employees, vendors, or other parties for alleged “wrongful acts” in the management of the organization. There is no standard coverage policy form. Therefore, it is important to read the terms, conditions, and exclusions of the policy. For example, the definition of “insured” differs among insurance
    2. Employment Practices Liability – Employment Practice Liability protects the organization against claims made by employees alleging discrimination, wrongful termination, harassment, and employment related issues. Most carriers do not insure Wage and Hour claims in California but some may offer a defense sublimit for wage and hour
  • Umbrella policy’s purpose is to protect your organization against a catastrophic liability loss. The Umbrella policy is a form of liability coverage protecting the policyholder for claims in excess of the limits of the primary General Liability, Automobile, or Workers’ Compensation. Umbrella policies may also include a few other liability coverages, such as: Professional Liability, Employee Benefits Liability and Abuse & Molestation.
  • Crime (Fidelity Bond) Insurance provides a source for recovery of funds embezzled by employees or volunteers. If your CPA or Bookkeeper is an independent contractor, make sure they provide you with proof of their insurance (General Liability, Professional Liability, Bond, and Workers compensation policies). If they do not carry their own insurance, discuss this exposure with your attorney, as most crime policies will not insure the acts of independent
  • Professional Liability Insurance coverage that indemnifies the insured for third-party liability claims due to negligence in the performance of professional services. Professionals include Doctors, Lawyers, Therapists, Social Workers, Engineers, etc. The Professional Liability coverage can be purchased as a separate policy or included under a General Liability policy form. However, most standalone professional liability policies are written on a claim made policy form. Therefore, be aware of the retroactive date listed on the policy.
  • Abuse and Molestation Coverage can be critical for social service organizations, especially those who work with children and vulnerable adults. There are no “standard” coverage form and before purchasing coverage make sure to read the terms, conditions, and exclusions carefully. Make sure to screen and supervise prospective employees and volunteers and review with your attorney to make sure your organization carries the adequate limits to protect your
  • Cyber Insurance is a special form of commercial insurance created to protect businesses against cyber (internet) risks, such as hackers and other breaches of computer system security. Also, check other insurance policies (such as General Liability and Directors & Officers) to determine if those policies carry cyber coverage, before purchasing a cyber policy. Claims resulting from cyber losses are on the rise and it is imperative to ensure that your organization has the proper controls in place to protect your data from a Most cyber policies are written on a claims-made basis, it is important to be aware of the retroactive date listed on the policy.
  • Automobile Liability covers organizations who use vehicles as part of their Company vehicles should be insured under a comprehensive commercial liability with limits high enough to protect the organization. If employees use personal vehicles for business, organizations should add hired and non-owned auto liability coverage to protect the business in the event the employee is in an accident.
Start the New Year off right by reviewing your risk management procedures. It is important that you review your current insurance coverages with your broker and attorney. Also, make sure your organization is in compliance by having your broker and attorney review your contracts.

Baker Romero offers an annual review of coverages as well as risk management and loss control services. Let us know if you have any questions regarding any of the coverages listed above or would like us to provide a quote. We are here to help and we wish you a happy and prosperous New Year.

**This article is intended only for informational purposes and not to be construed as legal advice.

Risk Management Basics: Preventing Slips, Trips, and falls

Written By: Rebecca Gomez

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One of the most common incidents that nonprofits face are slips, trips, and falls. These claims can be costly for many nonprofits and implementing an effective slip and fall incident prevention method will help prevent future claims and keep insurance premiums low. Your organization should establish a risk management policy that focuses on both prevention and procedures in the event an injury occurs. Some good practices include documenting the incident, collecting witness statements and any video surveillance (if possible). These practices can make a huge difference in defending your organization from fraudulent claims as well.

A basic “walk through” of your premises to find potential problems should be implemented daily. Below are a few tips to include in an effective slip, trip, and fall prevention risk management program:

  • Conduct a daily facility safety survey to look for common problems such as wet or greasy floors, loose mats, torn carpeting, bad lighting, clutter, cables or wires and uneven surfaces.
  • Immediately attend to any problems by putting up warning signs and/or closing an area off and taking steps to eliminate the hazard.
  • Maintain all floors and walkways on a consistent basis, using the recommended cleaning products and methods. Fix all uneven surfaces if possible by recoating or leveling the floor. You should mark or illuminate areas that cannot easily be leveled.
  • Train your employees and volunteers in slip and fall safety, and establish guidelines on how they should report problems and respond to customer injuries or hazardous situations
  • Make sure you have secure handrails for all stairs and balconies.
  • Take care of your outdoor areas, including sidewalks and parking lots. Potholes, snow and ice all create potential problems.
  • Additional or dry replacement entrance mats should be available on site during wet weather.
  • Document all of your efforts by keeping records of your daily safety inspections and any maintenance work to improve walking and working surfaces.

Best practice is to have a written policy in place and to train managers, employees, and volunteers on all safety procedures. Safety is everyone’s business!

Your organization should also have a written incident report form to document any such events. It is every employer’s responsibility to provide a safe environment. Be sure you are doing all that you can to recognize and reduce the risk. Slips, trips, and falls have the potential to be a major cause of injury for your employees, volunteers, vendors, and visitors. Be Prepared.

Let us know if you have any questions or would like more information. We are here to help.

Back to Basics: Cyber Risk Management and Your Employees

By Rebecca Gomez

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Addressing cyber security risk management procedures to all staff is critical to every organization. A recent report indicated two-thirds of all cyberattacks against organizations (large and small) result from employee negligence or malicious activities. The same report also indicated that external breaches only caused about 18 percent of cyberattacks. Human error, according to many studies, is the leading cause of cyber-attacks. Therefore, administrators and employees need regular training on how to identify and prevent cyber-attacks.

Minimizing cyber threats requires a cyber security plan that includes effective policies and procedures that account for legal compliance and data protection. These policies should include (not an exhaustive list):

  1. A bring your own device (BYOD) policy: governing whether or not an employee can use their own device to conduct business and the circumstances that deem whether or not personal cell phone use for business is appropriate.
  2. A password policy requiring the use strong and unique passwords that change at least every 6 months.
  3. Personnel policies that enhance security
  4. A network tracking policy requiring regular monitoring of network traffic for evidence of suspicious access.

Organizations should also have an incident response plan in place which outlines how a company will respond to suspected events. Implementing an incident response plan will help your organization to quickly investigate and remediate cyber-attacks. It will also outline the leaders of the response team and their responsibilities implementing the response plan.  The board of directors should be informed of the organizations cyber security program and exposure, as they are ultimately responsible.  Brown & Streza offers a unique proactive approach to a Data Security Breach plan that can help your organization prepare in the event of a breach.

Cyber Risk Insurance should be considered as part of your risk management plan (and not your only plan). A Cyber Risk Insurance policy can offer nonprofit organizations with affordable protection. There is no “standard” cyber policy form and administrators should review their cyber policies to understand what coverage their policy provides. Most standalone Cyber policies offer forensic investigation coverage, system restoration costs, defense and indemnity costs associated with litigation resulting from the loss of personal information, or other sensitive data and defense costs and penalties associated with regulatory investigations. Most General Liability policies now exclude coverage for cyber-related claims.

Please let us know if you have any questions regarding cyber risk management or would like us to provide you with a quote. (see attached application)

Can Water Damage Be Covered?

According to Nonprofits Insurance Alliance of California (NIAC), the most common uncovered property claim they receive is water damage. Property claims are generally waterdamagedeclined because of poorly maintained premises. Water damage is typically excluded from property policies with the exception that a covered cause of loss occurs first, such as wind or fire. Water damage claims can be preventable with regular maintenance. With the storms that have swept through California in the past few weeks, many organizations may have experience leaks and water damage from poor maintenance. Damage claims that are a result from improper maintenance are declined by most insurance carriers, as such damage is not categorized under a “sudden an unforeseen event.”

An effective risk management tip is to have routine property inspections. According to NIAC, some things that need to be checked regularly are: damaged flashing, roof scuppers, drains, gutters, and drain pipes. A failure to do so can turn a small fix into an expensive repair that would not be covered under your property policy. In other words, if damage can be deemed as a result of poor or negligent maintenance, it may be declined.

Also, consider purchasing flood insurance to protect your property. Flood insurance provides coverage against damage done by rising or overflowing bodies of water. Property policies, in general, do not insure flood damage.  If you have any questions about property or flood insurance, or would like us to provide a quote, please contact us. We are here to help.

*This article is intended to be used for informational purposes only and not to be construed as legal advice.